WHAT IS PUSH FOR YOUR TUSH?

Push for Your Tush is Canada's largest colon cancer event series in the country. With communities nationwide, Push for Your Tush has raised over $5.4 million dollars to date and continues to grow to support research, education, awareness and patient support. 

Held annually, the community oriented event provides a fun, family friendly atmosphere where survivors are celebrated, the lost are honoured, and supportive communities grow all while raising vital funds for both local initiatives and national research.

Why Push?
  • Because YOU can! 
  • Because colorectal cancer is the second leading cause of cancer-related death in men, and third in women. 
  • Because every day in Canada an average of 69 people are diagnosed and 25 succumb to the disease.
  • Because, colon cancer is preventable in many cases, and highly treatable when caught early. 
Stop the stigma around the C word; no not cancer - COLON. No need to be embarrassed! We all have a bum! We need to take care of it.

Push for Your Tush raises awareness and funds to save lives. It unites people who have been affected and provides a community of shared experience. It breaks the isolation, removes the embarrassment and starts a conversation. We need to talk about our Tush - Register NOW. The funds raised go towards research grants, awareness campaigns and patient support.

Time to PUSH YOUR TUSH - Register NOW!

At the Heart of It

On a crisp fall day in a North Toronto park in 1996, 100 friends and family members gathered to pay tribute to Maureen Lerman, Colon Cancer Canada’s  co-founders' Amy Elmaleh's mother and Bunnie Schwartz's sister as well as  Howard Schwartz, Bunnie's husband.

The first walk was a passion-project, made possible by the sweat and tears of family and friends. While the walk has grown, the love and passion of people touched by this disease are still the driving force. Across Canada, passionate volunteers contribute their time and energy to organize a walk and help their communities fight against this deadly disease.